It’s that time of year again when the dust is flying, grain trucks are prominent on the road and allergies are kicking it into high gear.

But that’s the Midwest.

Local agricultural officials are saying harvest 2020 is going to be a good year and that rain came just in time to help boost the crops.

Check out our special agriculture tab inserted in today’s edition for news on this year’s harvest, gardening and much more.

The third week in October has marked the busiest week for the ongoing corn and soybean harvests in Atchison and neighboring counties.

Pat Hegarty, Bunge Milling Inc. merchandiser, and Extension Agent Ray Ladd, Atchison County, agreed after the grain moisture levels checked around that 15 percent mark the harvest really got going and done in some fields.

“There has been a real uptick in deliveries,” Hegarty said on Tuesday, Oct. 20. “The real shock is that of the corn currently delivered none has been over 15 percent.”

The moisture level is testing about 12 percent. The corn yields are averaging between 220 to 230 bushels per acre, Hegarty said. There are some record yields coming in from the Valley Falls vicinity. Brown and Doniphan counties had very good averages too, Hegarty said.

All the farms throughout the county appear to be having great progress, Ladd said of both the ongoing corn and bean harvests. The corn harvest is on pause for soybean producers to tend to their bean crops, Ladd said. On Monday, Oct. 19 Ladd estimated only there was only 10 percent of soybean acreage left in the field throughout the county. The majority of the bean harvest is done and the focus will turn back to corn.

Because harvest has progressed much better than expected due to the lack of normal precipitation the harvest season is about three-quarters of the way done, Ladd said. He projected the majority of the harvest will be done around the time of Halloween.

Beans have been averaging yields to about 60 to 70 bushels to the acre, Hegarty said, and added the past 10 days have been very busy ones.

“So far so good it’s about done,” Hegarty said of the 2020 harvest season. He estimated the corn harvest is about 75 percent done. “Ten good days should wrap it up,” Hegarty projected.

Both Hegarty and Ladd agreed the 17 inches of rainfall in July was a blessing for corn production that resulted in higher than average yields. The dry weather spell along with heat and breezy conditions seemingly worked together that resulted in the higher than average yields.

The third week in October has marked the busiest week for the ongoing corn and soybean harvests in Atchison and neighboring counties.

Pat Hegarty, Bunge Milling Inc. merchandiser, and Extension Agent Ray Ladd, Atchison County, agreed after the grain moisture levels checked around that 15 percent mark the harvest really got going and done in some fields.

“There has been a real uptick in deliveries,” Hegarty said on Tuesday, Oct. 20. “The real shock is that of the corn currently delivered none has been over 15 percent.”

The moisture level is testing about 12 percent. The corn yields are averaging between 220 to 230 bushels per acre, Hegarty said. There are some record yields coming in from the Valley Falls vicinity. Brown and Doniphan counties had very good averages too, Hegarty said.

All the farms throughout the county appear to be having great progress, Ladd said of both the ongoing corn and bean harvests. The corn harvest is on pause for soybean producers to tend to their bean crops, Ladd said. On Monday, Oct. 19 Ladd estimated only there was only 10 percent of soybean acreage left in the field throughout the county. The majority of the bean harvest is done and the focus will turn back to corn.

Because harvest has progressed much better than expected due to the lack of normal precipitation the harvest season is about three-quarters of the way done, Ladd said. He projected the majority of the harvest will be done around the time of Halloween.

Beans have been averaging yields to about 60 to 70 bushels to the acre, Hegarty said, and added the past 10 days have been very busy ones.

“So far so good it’s about done,” Hegarty said of the 2020 harvest season. He estimated the corn harvest is about 75 percent done. “Ten good days should wrap it up,” Hegarty projected.

Both Hegarty and Ladd agreed the 17 inches of rainfall in July was a blessing for corn production that resulted in higher than average yields. The dry weather spell along with heat and breezy conditions seemingly worked together that resulted in the higher than average yields.

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